Jane Kim’s Victory in District 6; Jean Quan in Oakland; Meg Whitman’s Money …

by on November 9, 2010

To the Editor:

“Don’t Stop Believing” … Movement building is always rooted in grassroots organizing … I am so proud of the hard work, Jane Kim!

Rev. Norman Fong
San Francisco


To the Editor:

Thanks for this article. I campaigned for Jane Kim and right from the start, asked my Filipino friends to vote for her. I also live in District 6, and really pleased that Jane is my supervisor. By the way, how do you make out of Chris Daly’s non-endorsement of Jane Kim when she is, on top of being progressive, a more winnable candidate than James Keys?

Mauro Tumbocon
San Francisco


To the Editor:

I absolutely agree with Mr. Shaw’s analysis of the District 6 supervisorial election result. The SF Democratic County Central Committee underestimated and ignored the voting power of the Asian Pacific Americans. We are no longer “ignorant” in the electoral process, because in the last 10-15 years APA organizations and community leaders have been educating our communities about the power of our votes. Therefore, the victory of Jane Kim, whom I supported, is a warning to the “old boys white club” politicians that the dragon is awake and watching. It will be no surprise if the next San Francisco mayor in 2012 will be an Asian. We are building our bases in every district of San Francisco. We vote Big!

Andres Bonifacio
San Francisco


To the Editor:

Randy Shaw continues to mislead readers about the Bay Guardian’s relationship with Jane Kim, who we endorsed this election in our number two slot, a fact you neglected to mention because it would undermine your ridiculous argument. As a District 6 voter, I also personally voted for Jane as my second choice and I was happy to see her win. Those were each far more significant gestures than an off-the-cuff comment I made to Jane in a bar last year.

The only machine-building going on here is yours, as evidenced by yet another self-serving article promoting your taxpayer-subsidized political operation. Also, I wasn’t a “Walker backer.” Unlike your boy Paul Hogarth, who worked on the Kim campaign that you’re celebrating. I’m a journalist — someone who’s fair, non-partisan, and independent, standards you evidently don’t aspire to.

Steve Jones
City Editor, SF Bay Guardian


To the Editor:

Jane Kim propaganda. She is a carpetbagger. Won on her “chicky” looks, and victim minority plea. Debra Walker was the far better candidate, and human. Her two decades of service (in the true sense of the word which is freely given) to District 6 will shine long after this election. Very jaded, and Kim idolizing article.

Susan Walker
San Francisco


To the Editor:

Randy wrote: “But with every election, a higher percentage of the electorate is voting absentee. In fact, a majority of San Francisco voters in this election voted absentee. This reduces the electoral power of the slate card, and of the increasingly insular San Francisco Democratic machine.

Your story on how progressive machine politics backfired in this last election was fascinating. I especially liked your observation on how mail-in voting favors individual decision-making. One last point: District 6 is becoming slightly more conservative as a different breed of renter / owner moves into newly built dense buildings South of Market / Mission Bay. These often tech folks have a median income of $100,000. That doesn’t make them Republicans, but it does make them moderate voters.

Dana B.
San Francisco


To the Editor:

Re: “How Jane Kim Defeated the San Francisco Democratic Machine” (BeyondChron, November 8, 2010), Jane Kim will be an outstanding District 6 Supervisor.

Jane Kim draws her strength from her commitment to the people of the community, not to some allegiance to a political party’s machinery. The people of the community are her constituency.

I saw Jane Kim’s grassroots campaigning first hand in San Francisco’s Tenderloin. On the day before Election Day, I met Jane Kim and her father, Richard Kim, at the corner of Eddy Street and Larkin Street at noontime to help her in her campaign. This street corner serves as the geographical beginning of San Francisco’s “Little Saigon.”

Jane Kim carried a big black canvass bag with the logo, “See Jane Run.” She brought with her campaign materials in English, Vietnamese, and Chinese. Her father proudly wore a bright red shirt emblazoned with his daughter’s name on it.

Jane Kim and her father stood in front of a corner grocery store greeting every kind of passerby. The people reflected the rich mixture of the Tenderloin – – the spectrum of races, ethnic groups, and ages, and all kinds of socio-economic life situations. Jane Kim greeted each person warmly and genuinely, and was greeted by the people enthusiastically. Many expressed their support of her candidacy, and told her they were rooting for her. One Chinese gentleman told her, “You are going to be a mayor of San Francisco.”

I campaigned for Jane Kim in a neighborhood where I have worked for the Vietnamese American community as well as the larger community. In this neighborhood, the statue of a fearless “Tiger” greets all to “Little Saigon” and the Tenderloin.

I visited the Vietnamese restaurants that line Larkin Street, and spoke to the patrons about Jane Kim’s candidacy. Joining Jane Kim, her father, and me on the campaign trail that day was an older Vietnamese man.

What I saw in “Little Saigon” and the Tenderloin was that Jane Kim is a candidate for the people and of the people, a candidate who is not afraid to rub shoulders with the ordinary people of San Francisco, a grassroots candidate who is prepared and committed to work for the benefit of the people of the Tenderloin and all of District 6 and who is ready to roll up her sleeves to work hard.

Jane Kim and other candidates who arrive at City Hall not on the coattails of long-time politicians, political party machine, or any of the media that perpetuate them, will provide the fresh air to the halls of government at City Hall that San Francisco needs and deserves.

Anh Le
San Francisco


To the Editor:

This is exactly the way I feel as an Oaklander! My fears of a Don Perata city are cautiously reserved (in this moment), and your article summed me up EXACTLY! If Oakland can’t do it, then it won’t be done nationally. So, this election brings hope!

Dia Robinson
Oakland, CA


To the Editor:

Ranked Choice Voting enabled this victory. Jean Quan would not have beaten Don Perata in a head-to-head runoff, like we used to have. The Oakland Green Party, along with Greens everywhere, began pushing for RCV 18 years ago. It was a long slog – but little by little, support for RCV grew from the radical left, to the progressive left, and finally, even to many liberals. It’s a terrific example of how radicals with a long range vision can champion an electoral reform, and through patient work time win mainstream acceptance for it. Now, we have to get the message out loud and clear. RCV enabled the people of Oakland to elect Quan over Perata.

Jonathan Nack
Oakland, CA


To the Editor:

An extremely relevant factor you did not include in your entirely *first person* evaluation of Jean Quan’s candidate race – Ms.Quan sent out an email to all of her subscribers, asking them to vote for her as their second choice. I believe that this meant that Rebecca Kaplan voters gave her their *oh, what the hell* second choice slot on their ballot. An extremely clever, strategic and well-thought out move on Ms. Quan’s part. Congrats!

Tracy C.
Oakland, CA


To the Editor:

You can call it a political miracle, but the fact of the matter is that Jean Quan used her community organizing skills in getting votes from Oaklanders. I don’t live in Oakland, but I supported Jean financially and had been calling my friends who live there to vote for her because she’s true to her words. Money can’t really buy votes all the times.

You have to understand that before Jean entered into dirty money politics, she was a student activist, a parent activist, a labor organizer, and a community activist who lives in Oakland. It’s building relationship with people through one-on-one organizing and networking. No doubt she’ll be the first female Asian mayor in a major city of California. I am proud of her.

It’s no miracle, my friend; but of course, the ranked choice voting certainly helped her beat the old machine.

Daz Lamparas
San Francisco


To the Editor:

Meg Whitman spent more than $160 million — $141.5 of her own money — in her losing campaign for Governor. Unfortunately, very little of this money will trickle down to the needy shortchanged by California’s budget. Just think how much health care, social services, and education $160 million could have purchased.

Ralph E. Stone
San Francisco


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